How Modern Day Vellum Stationery is Produced

While vellum made from animal skins is still produced, the process is obviously painstaking and costly. Vellum is generally only used for archival copies of important documents. Vellum paper and vellum stationery today is made using cotton rag fibers to create a high-quality, translucent paper with a smooth, vellum-like finish. The highest quality vellum paper, sometimes called Japanese vellum or vegetable vellum, is made from 100% cotton fiber, which gives a smooth, almost polished surface to the paper.

Today, vellum usually refers to one of two very different kinds of paper. Vellum paper, often used in scrapbooking or to draw blueprints, is generally translucent and comes in a variety of colors. It may appear to be plasticized, or made of Mylar because of its texture and translucency. It is often used as overlays for wedding invitations, cards, scrapbooks or programs.

Vellum may also refer to vellum finish, a slightly rough surface paper that is extremely high quality, holds ink well and is preferred by many businesses because of its crisp, heavy profile. Vellum stationery is the epitome of quality, the ideal choice for executive communications, formal invitations and programs.

Your office stationery and executive stationery conveys a certain impression to your customers and associates. Vellum stationery in gray, buff, white or pale blue is a traditional choice for executive stationery because it carries the hallmark of quality and tradition. Engraved or personalized with your monogram, vellum stationery says that you value the finer things in life. If that is the image you want your letters to convey to your business and professional contacts, then an investment in 100% cotton rag, high quality vellum stationery is the choice for you.

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